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Sex difference in the incidence of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

Authors
  • Singh, Sunny S.1, 2
  • Roeters-van Lennep, Jeanine E.1
  • Lemmers, Roosmarijn F. H.1
  • van Herpt, Thijs T. W.3
  • Lieverse, Aloysius G.2
  • Sijbrands, Eric J. G.1
  • van Hoek, Mandy1
  • 1 Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam,
  • 2 Maxima Medical Center,
  • 3 Amphia Hospital,
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta Diabetologica
Publisher
Springer Milan
Publication Date
Feb 05, 2020
Volume
57
Issue
6
Pages
725–732
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00592-020-01489-6
PMID: 32025877
PMCID: PMC7220974
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major cause of death and disability due to its long-term macro- and microvascular diseases. Although women with type 2 diabetes have more macrovascular diseases, it is unclear whether there are sex differences in the occurrence of microvascular disease. The aim of our study was to investigate sex differences in the incidence of microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. Methods Analyses were performed in the DiaGene study, a prospective cohort study for complications of type 2 diabetes, collected in the city of Eindhoven, the Netherlands ( n = 1886, mean follow-up time = 6.93 years). Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for risk factors for complications (age, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, HbA1c and duration of type 2 diabetes) were used to analyze the incidence of microvascular complications in men and women. Results The incidence of microalbuminuria was significantly higher in men (HR microalbuminuria 1.64 [CI 1.21–2.24], p = 0.002). Additionally, men are more likely to develop two or three microvascular complications compared to women (OR 2.42 [CI 1.69–3.45], p < 0.001). Conclusions This study shows that men with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop microvascular complications, especially microalbuminuria. Furthermore, men seem to have a higher chance of developing multiple microvascular complications. Our results highlight that men and women may not benefit to a similar extent from current treatment approaches to prevent diabetes-related microvascular diseases. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1007/s00592-020-01489-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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