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Sex-Dependent Cognitive Performance in Baboon Offspring Following Maternal Caloric Restriction in Pregnancy and Lactation

Authors
  • Rodriguez, Jesse S.1
  • Bartlett, Thad Q.2
  • Keenan, Kathryn E.3
  • Nathanielsz, Peter W.1
  • Nijland, Mark J.1
  • 1 University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA , San Antonio (United States)
  • 2 University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, USA , San Antonio (United States)
  • 3 University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA , Chicago (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Reproductive Sciences
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
May 01, 2012
Volume
19
Issue
5
Pages
493–504
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1933719111424439
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

In humans a suboptimal diet during development has negative outcomes in offspring. We investigated the behavioral outcomes in baboons born to mothers undergoing moderate maternal nutrient restriction (MNR). Maternal nutrient restriction mothers (n = 7) were fed 70% of food eaten by controls (CTR, n = 12) fed ad libitum throughout gestation and lactation. At 3.3 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]) years of age offspring (controls: female [FC, n = 8], male [MC, n = 4]; nutrient restricted: female [FR, n = 3] and male [MR, n = 4]) were administered progressive ratio, simple discrimination, intra-/extra-dimension set shift and delayed matching to sample tasks to assess motivation, learning, attention, and working memory, respectively. A treatment effect was observed in MNR offspring who demonstrated less motivation and impaired working memory. Nutrient-restricted female offspring showed improved learning, while MR offspring showed impaired learning and attentional set shifting and increased impulsivity. In summary, 30% restriction in maternal caloric intake has long lasting neurobehavioral outcomes in adolescent male baboon offspring.

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