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Severe Delayed Drug Reactions: Role of Genetics and Viral Infections.

Authors
  • Pavlos, Rebecca1
  • White, Katie D2
  • Wanjalla, Celestine2
  • Mallal, Simon A3
  • Phillips, Elizabeth J4
  • 1 Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, 6150 Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
  • 3 Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, 6150 Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. , (Australia)
  • 4 Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, 6150 Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Immunology and allergy clinics of North America
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2017
Volume
37
Issue
4
Pages
785–815
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.iac.2017.07.007
PMID: 28965641
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant source of patient morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden to health care systems and drug development. Up to 50% of such reactions are preventable. Although many ADRs can be predicted based on the on-target pharmacologic activity, ADRs arising from drug interactions with off-target receptors are recognized. Off-target ADRs include the immune-mediated ADRs (IM-ADRs) and pharmacologic drug effects. In this review, we discuss what is known about the immunogenetics and pathogenesis of IM-ADRs and the hypothesized role of heterologous immunity in the development of IM-ADRs.

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