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Serum lipidome screening in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

Authors
  • Klupczynska, Agnieszka1
  • Plewa, Szymon2
  • Kasprzyk, Mariusz3
  • Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech3
  • Kokot, Zenon J2
  • Matysiak, Jan2
  • 1 Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Grunwaldzka 6 Street, 60-780, Poznan, Poland. [email protected] , (Poland)
  • 2 Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Grunwaldzka 6 Street, 60-780, Poznan, Poland. , (Poland)
  • 3 Department of Thoracic Surgery, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szamarzewskiego 62 Street, 60-569, Poznan, Poland. , (Poland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical and experimental medicine
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
4
Pages
505–513
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10238-019-00566-7
PMID: 31264112
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The ability of early lung cancer diagnosis is an unmet need in clinical practice. Lung cancer metabolomic analyses conducted so far have demonstrated several abnormalities in cancer lipid profile providing a rationale for further study of blood lipidome of the patients. In the present research, we performed a targeted lipidome screening to select molecules that show promise for early lung cancer detection. The study was conducted on serum samples collected from newly diagnosed, stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and non-cancer controls. A high-throughput mass spectrometry-based platform with confirmed interlaboratory reproducibility was used. The analyzed profile consisted of acylcarnitines, sphingomyelins, phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines. Among the assayed lipid species, the significant differences between NSCLC and non-cancer subjects were observed in the group of phosphatidylcholines (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPC), especially in the levels of lysoPC a C26:0; lysoPC a C26:1; PC aa C42:4; and PC aa C34:4. The metabolites mentioned above were used to create a multivariate classification model, which reliability was proved by permutation tests as well as external validation. Our study indicated choline-containing phospholipids as potential lung cancer markers. Further investigations of phospholipidome are crucial to better describe the shifts in metabolite composition occurring in lung cancer patients.

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