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Sensitization of intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo by a host-targeted antimicrobial agent.

Authors
  • Lo, Jung-Hsin
  • Kulp, Samuel K
  • Chen, Ching-Shih
  • Chiu, Hao-Chieh
Type
Published Article
Journal
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2014
Volume
58
Issue
12
Pages
7375–7382
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1128/AAC.03778-14
PMID: 25267669
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Aminoglycosides exhibit relatively poor activity against intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium due to their low permeativity across eukaryotic cell membranes. Previously, we identified the unique ability of AR-12, a celecoxib-derived small-molecule agent, to eradicate intracellular Salmonella Typhimurium in macrophages by facilitating autophagosome formation and suppressing Akt kinase signaling. In light of this unique mode of antibacterial action, we investigated the ability of AR-12 to sensitize intracellular Salmonella to aminoglycosides in macrophages and in an animal model. The antibacterial activities of AR-12 combined with various aminoglycosides, including streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and amikacin, against intracellular S. Typhimurium in murine RAW264.7 macrophages were assessed. Cells were infected with S. Typhimurium followed by treatment with AR-12 or individual aminoglycosides or with combinations for 24 h. The in vivo efficacies of AR-12, alone or in combination with gentamicin or amikacin, were also assessed by treating S. Typhimurium-infected BALB/c mice daily for 14 consecutive days. Exposure of S. Typhimurium-infected RAW264.7 cells to a combination of AR-12 with individual aminoglycosides led to a reduction in bacterial survival (P < 0.05), both intracellular and extracellular, that was greater than that seen with the aminoglycosides alone. This sensitizing effect, however, was not associated with increased aminoglycoside penetration into bacteria or macrophages. Moreover, daily intraperitoneal injection of AR-12 at 0.1 mg/kg of body weight significantly increased the in vivo efficacy of gentamicin and amikacin in prolonging the survival of S. Typhimurium-infected mice. These findings indicate that the unique ability of AR-12 to enhance the in vivo efficacy of aminoglycosides might have translational potential for efforts to develop novel strategies for the treatment of salmonellosis.

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