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Sensilla on the antenna of blow fly, Triceratopyga calliphoroides Rohdendorf (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

Authors
  • Zhang, D
  • Liu, X H
  • Wang, Q K
  • Li, K
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2014
Volume
113
Issue
7
Pages
2577–2586
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00436-014-3909-6
PMID: 24777341
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Blow fly, Triceratopyga calliphoroides Rohdendorf, is a common and synanthropic species of medical and forensic significance in eastern Asia. Field monitoring studies have indicated that olfaction system plays an important role in guiding the behavior of insect species. To further our understanding of fly olfaction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) are applied to examine the sensillar morphology of adults, with an emphasis on sensory pit and sacculus. Both microtrichiae and several mechanoreceptors are detected on antennal scape and pedicel. Except for these two structures, pedicellar buttons are also found in antennal pedicellar depression after the separation of antennal pedicel and funiculus. Eight types of antennal sensilla are observed on external surface of antennal funiculus (one type of trichoid sensilla, three types of basiconic sensilla, three types of coeloconic sensilla, and one type of clavate-like sensilla), while two types (one type of basiconic sensilla and one type of coeloconic-like sensilla) are detected at the inner surface of sensory pits or sacculus. As the first to investigate cuticular invaginations of blow flies via paraffin section, the internal structure of abundant sensory pits and an excessively complex sacculus on antennal funiculus are revealed. After comparison to other species previously studied, this phenomenon is proved to be the most unique feature of T. calliphoroides, armed with a discussion on its morphology, function, and possible evolutionary implications.

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