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Self-reported oral health predicts tooth loss after five and ten years in a population-based study.

Authors
  • Meisel, Peter1, 2
  • Holtfreter, Birte1, 2
  • Völzke, Henry3
  • Kocher, Thomas1, 2
  • 1 Dental School, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Dental Clinics, Department of Periodontology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Institute for Community Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2018
Volume
45
Issue
10
Pages
1164–1172
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jcpe.12997
PMID: 30099763
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To assess the suitability of self-reported oral health status to predict 5- and 10-year tooth loss without involvement of any clinical measures. Within the population Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), 2,776 subjects with 5-year follow-up data and 2,016 subjects with 10-year follow-up examination data were studied. Self-rated oral health was assessed at baseline and related to 5- and 10-year tooth loss. Odds ratios and probability of loss were estimated. Five- and 10-year tooth loss was significantly associated with baseline self-rated oral health. The predictive value of oral health ratings for tooth loss was comparable to that of the CDC/AAP case definition or caries and periodontitis diagnostics. In regression analyses including age, sex, smoking, education, income, and further items collected from questionnaires, odds ratios for dichotomous tooth loss associated with rating of oral health as poor were 3.04 (95% CI: 2.43-3.82) and 2.80 (2.11-3.71) after 5 and 10 years, respectively. Prediction with cut-off probability at 0.25 resulted in sensitivity 85.8% and specificity 44.2% for 5 years, and that with cut-off probability at 0.40 resulted in sensitivity 83.5% and specificity 46.5% for 10 years. Self-reported oral health provides reliable predictions of tooth loss comparable to those assessed by clinical diagnostics. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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