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Self-regulation and early writing: A longitudinal examination from preschool through first grade.

Authors
  • Puranik, Cynthia1
  • Li, Hongli2
  • 1 Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Georgia)
  • 2 Department of Educational Policy Studies, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. , (Georgia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
220
Pages
105420–105420
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105420
PMID: 35378323
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Previous research has established the important role of self-regulation in supporting school readiness and academic learning. However, most of the research has not included examinations of the relation between early writing and self-regulation, although writing is an academic skill that also contributes to school readiness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the associations between self-regulation and early writing as children transitioned from preschool to first grade. Two groups of children were followed longitudinally. Group 1 (n = 171) was followed from preschool to kindergarten to Grade 1, and Group 2 (n = 196) was followed from a first year of preschool (Preschool 1) to a second year of preschool (Preschool 2) to kindergarten. Writing assessments included tasks at the word, sentence, and discourse levels. Self-regulation was measured using the Heads-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task. Writing and self-regulation were stable across the early years. Writing achievement was concurrently related to and significantly predicted later self-regulation. Self-regulation was concurrently associated with writing achievement but did not predict later writing achievement. Structural equation modeling results indicated that writing was a significant predictor of longitudinal change in self-regulation from preschool to kindergarten. The bidirectional relations between self-regulation and writing achievement were not supported by the data. Implications of the findings and future directions are discussed, including the effect of task demands in understanding relations between self-regulation and academic skills. Copyright © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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