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Self-Esteem Trajectories and Their Social Determinants in Adolescents With Different Levels of Cognitive Ability.

Authors
  • Morin, Alexandre J S1
  • Arens, A Katrin2
  • Tracey, Danielle3
  • Parker, Philip D4
  • Ciarrochi, Joseph4
  • Craven, Rhonda G4
  • Maïano, Christophe5
  • 1 Alexandre J. S. Morin, Substantive-Methodological Synergy Research Laboratory Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 A. Katrin Arens, German Institute for International Educational Research, Frankfurt, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Danielle Tracey, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Philip D. Parker, Joseph Ciarrochi, and Rhonda G. Craven, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, Australia; and. , (Australia)
  • 5 Christophe Maïano, Cyberpsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychoeducation and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO), Saint-Jérôme, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2017
Volume
122
Issue
6
Pages
539–560
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1352/1944-7558-122.6.539
PMID: 29115873
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examines the development of self-esteem in a sample of 138 Australian adolescents (90 males; 48 females) with cognitive abilities in the lowest 15% (L-CA) and a matched sample of 556 Australian adolescents (312 males; 244 females) with average to high levels of cognitive abilities (A/H-CA). These participants were measured annually (Grade 7 to 12). The findings showed that adolescents with L-CA and A/H-CA experience similar high and stable self-esteem trajectories that present similar relations with key predictors (sex, school usefulness and dislike, parenting, and peer integration). Both groups revealed substantial gender differences showing higher levels of self-esteem for adolescent males remaining relatively stable over time, compared to lower levels among adolescent females which decreased until midadolescence before increasing back.

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