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Self-reported racial discrimination and substance use among Asian Americans in Arizona.

Authors
  • Yoo, Hyung Chol
  • Gee, Gilbert C
  • Lowthrop, Craig K
  • Robertson, Joanne
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of immigrant and minority health / Center for Minority Public Health
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2010
Volume
12
Issue
5
Pages
683–690
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10903-009-9306-z
PMID: 20012204
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We examined associations between different forms of self-reported racial discrimination and current substance use (i.e., smoking, alcohol use, and controlled substance use) among Asian Americans living in Arizona. The data are from 271 Asian American adults participating in the 2008 Asian Pacific Arizona Inititative (APAZI) Survey, which is part of a larger collaboration between community members, organizational leaders, and researchers. Asian Americans treated like they were not American because of their race were at increased risk of tobacco use, after controlling for covariates, including age, gender, education, family income, health insurance, nativity status, and language, and other types of racial discrimination. Also, individuals treated differently because of their race were at increased risk of alcohol use and controlled substance use, after controlling for covariates and other types of racial discrimination. The results indicate that Asian Americans experience a wide range of racial discrimination types and some forms of racial discrimination may have greater associations with tobacco, alcohol, and controlled substance use than others.

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