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Self-image and its relation to denture acceptance.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry
0022-3913
Publisher
Elsevier - Mosby
Publication Date
Volume
35
Issue
2
Pages
131–141
Identifiers
PMID: 1061807
Source
Medline

Abstract

A study was initiated to determine whether a relationship exists in geriatric patients between self-image and the extent of their denture acceptance. Three assessing instruments were employed, namely, a "Focused Interview," the embedded-figures test, and projective figure drawings. Scores obtained were compared with scores on the Denture-Acceptance Rating Scale. The research results derived from the data follow: 1. Comparison of the degree of denture acceptance with the scores on all three assessing instruments showed significant relationships. Therefore, the hypothesis under study was accepted. 2. The "Focused Interview" appeared particularly well suited to a geriatric population, because it was nonthreatening, provided a communication outlet, and can be readily employed by a practitioner. 3. The embedded-figures test and the projective figure drawings appeared less appropriate for this population because of factors such as psychomotor retardation, perceptual difficulties, and diminution of ego strength which accompany the aging process. 4. The men in this study appeared to accept dentures more readily than the women, manifested higher morale, and were more field-independent. 5. Employed subjects, as compared to unemployed, showed significantly greater denture acceptance, higher morale and self-image, and a greater degree of field-independence. These factors appeared related to greater flexibility of adaptation. 6. Socioeconomic factors appeared to be significantly and positively related to morale factors. 7. Complaints regarding dentures were largely of a physical nature. They appeared to relate primarily to difficulties with adjustment to the new artifact which represented an alteration of body image for the subjects. 8. The study provided corroborative evidence of the need for the dentist to make an initial assessment of those personality factors in his patients which might limit his ability to provide adequate dental services.

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