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Self-blame, self-forgiveness, and spirituality in breast cancer survivors in a public sector setting.

Authors
  • Friedman, Lois C
  • Barber, Catherine R
  • Chang, Jenny
  • Tham, Yee Lu
  • Kalidas, Mamta
  • Rimawi, Mothaffar F
  • Dulay, Mario F
  • Elledge, Richard
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cancer Education
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2010
Volume
25
Issue
3
Pages
343–348
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s13187-010-0048-3
PMID: 20186521
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cognitive appraisal affects adjustment to breast cancer. A self-forgiving attitude and spirituality may benefit breast cancer survivors who blame themselves for their cancer. One hundred and eight women with early breast cancers completed questionnaires assessing self-blame, self-forgiveness, spirituality, mood and quality of life (QoL) in an outpatient breast clinic. Women who blamed themselves reported more mood disturbance (p < 0.01) and poorer QoL (p < 0.01). Women who were more self-forgiving and more spiritual reported less mood disturbance and better QoL (p's < 0.01). Interventions that reduce self-blame and facilitate self-forgiveness and spirituality could promote better adjustment to breast cancer.

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