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Selective management of pediatric esophageal foreign bodies.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American surgeon
Publication Date
Volume
61
Issue
2
Pages
132–134
Identifiers
PMID: 7856972
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Esophageal foreign body is a relatively common consultation from the Pediatric Emergency Room. This study evaluates optimal selective management of esophageal foreign bodies in the pediatric patient. Eighty-six children have been referred for esophageal foreign body. Fifteen had been symptomatic for 48 or more hours before being seen. In eight, there was a known history of previous repair for esophageal atresia. In 88%, the foreign body was opaque, most frequently a coin. The most common nonopaque foreign body was retained food. Upon diagnosis, 72 children were taken to radiology, where balloon extraction under fluoroscopic control was attempted. Fourteen children went directly to the operating room for endoscopy and foreign body removal. Balloon extraction was successful in 62 cases (86%), and the children were discharged directly from the Emergency Department. The foreign body was successfully removed at esophagoscopy in the 10 cases that failed attempts at balloon extraction. Since 1990, successful extraction has been accomplished in 100% of cases (29/29). Neither balloon extraction nor endoscopy was associated with morbidity or mortality. Endoscopy was, however, associated with total hospital charges approximately 400% higher than balloon extraction. Fluoroscopically guided balloon extraction of appropriate esophageal foreign bodies is a safe and cost-effective alternative to endoscopy. Failure of nonoperative management does not complicate subsequent endoscopic removal. Patients with symptoms > 48 hours, a history of prior esophageal atresia, and/or nonopaque esophageal foreign bodies do not preclude attempt at balloon extraction.

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