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Segmented Forefoot Plate in Basketball Footwear: Does it Influence Performance and Foot Joint Kinematics and Kinetics?

Authors
  • Lam, Wing-Kai1, 2
  • Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun3
  • Lee, Wei Min4
  • Ma, Christina Zong-Hao5
  • Kong, Pui Wah4
  • 1 1 Shenyang Sport University.
  • 2 2 Li Ning Sports Science Research Center.
  • 3 3 University of Wollongong.
  • 4 4 Nanyang Technological University.
  • 5 5 The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. , (Hong Kong SAR China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Publisher
Human Kinetics
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
34
Issue
1
Pages
31–38
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1123/jab.2017-0044
PMID: 28836881
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined the effects of shoes' segmented forefoot stiffness on athletic performance and ankle and metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics and kinetics in basketball movements. Seventeen university basketball players performed running vertical jumps and 5-m sprints at maximum effort with 3 basketball shoes of various forefoot plate conditions (medial plate, medial + lateral plates, and no-plate control). One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were used to examine the differences in athletic performance, joint kinematics, and joint kinetics among the 3 footwear conditions (α = .05). Results indicated that participants wearing medial + lateral plates shoes demonstrated 2.9% higher jump height than those wearing control shoes (P = .02), but there was no significant differences between medial plate and control shoes (P > .05). Medial plate shoes produced greater maximum plantar flexion velocity than the medial + lateral plates shoes (P < .05) during sprinting. There were no significant differences in sprint time. These findings implied that inserting plates spanning both the medial and lateral aspects of the forefoot could enhance jumping, but not sprinting performances. The use of a medial plate alone, although induced greater plantar flexion velocity at the metatarsophalangeal joint during sprinting, was not effective in improving jump heights or sprint times.

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