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Second neoplasms in adult patients submitted to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Authors
  • Torrent, Anna1
  • Ferrá, Christelle2
  • Morgades, Mireia2
  • Jiménez, María-José2
  • Sancho, Juan-Manuel2
  • Vives, Susana2
  • Batlle, Montserrat2
  • Moreno, Miriam2
  • Xicoy, Blanca2
  • Oriol, Albert2
  • Ibarra, Gladys2
  • Ribera, Josep-Maria2
  • 1 Servicio de Hematología Clínica, Institut Català d'Oncologia-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Institut de Recerca contra la Leucèmia Josep Carreras, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Barcelona, España. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Servicio de Hematología Clínica, Institut Català d'Oncologia-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Institut de Recerca contra la Leucèmia Josep Carreras, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Barcelona, España.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Medicina Clínica
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jun 08, 2018
Volume
150
Issue
11
Pages
421–427
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.medcli.2017.07.004
PMID: 28874263
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
Spanish
License
Unknown

Abstract

Patients submitted to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased risk of late complications, such as second neoplasm (SN). The incidence and risk factors of SN in patients receiving HSCT at a single centre were analysed. The follow-up of adult patients who received a first HSCT (autologous [auto-HSCT] or allogeneic [allo-HSCT]) between January 2000 and December 2015 was reviewed. We collected their demographic characteristics, the primary disease and type of HSCT, and analysed the cumulative incidence of SN and their risk factors. Of 699 transplanted patients (auto-HSCT, n=451; allo-HSCT, n=248), 42 (6%) developed SN (17 haematological and 25 solid), 31 post-auto-HSCT and 11 post-allo-HSCT. Haematologic SN were more frequent after auto-HSCT than after allo-HSCT. The median time between HSCT and SN was 4.09 years [range 0.07-13.15], with no differences between auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT. The cumulative incidence of SN was 5% (95% CI 3-6) at 5 years, 7% (95% CI 5-10) at 10 years and 11% (95% CI 8-15) at 15 years, without differences according to the type of HSCT. Only the age over 40 years correlated with an increased risk of SN. In this series, the incidence of post-HSCT SN was similar to that previously described. Patients submitted to an auto-HSCT showed a higher frequency of haematologic SN. A higher incidence of SN was detected in patients older than 40 at the time of HSCT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

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