Seasonal variation of peptidase activities in the reproductive tract of Crotalus durissus terrificus

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Seasonal variation of peptidase activities in the reproductive tract of Crotalus durissus terrificus

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
General and Comparative Endocrinology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 27, 2009
Volume
160
Issue
1
Pages
84–92
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ygcen.2008.10.022
Source
MyScienceWork
License
Green

Abstract

Seasonal quantitative patterns of acid (APA), basic (APB), puromycin-sensitive (APN-PS) and puromycin-insensitive neutral (APN-PI), cystyl (CAP), dipeptidyl IV (DPPIV), type-1 pyroglutamyl (PAP-I) and prolyl-imino (PIP) aminopeptidases and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) activities in soluble (SF) and solubilized membrane-bound (MF) fractions from ductus deferens, vagina and uterus were studied to evaluate their relationships with the reproductive cycle and the extensive long-term spermatozoa storage (LTSS) of the Neotropical rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. APB, PIP and POP were detected only in SF, while other peptidases were detected in SF and MF. APB, APN-PI and APN-PS were predominant in most tissues in all seasons. Peptidase activities had a common pattern of increment during the dry season (winter/autumn), which coincides with the mating period (autumn) and LTSS in the female (winter), as well as the reduction of spermatozoa motility and maintenance of fertilization capacity of spermatozoa. The high CAP activity in the soluble fraction of the vagina during winter, compared to summer (time of parturition) and spring, coincides with the relaxation of this tissue. In the soluble fraction, the low PAP-I activity of the ductus deferens coincided with its high activity in the vagina during the winter; and the inverse occurred in summer, which is consistent with the physiological process of preserving spermatozoon viability. In conclusion, the studied peptidase activities had seasonal and tissue-specific characteristics, which suggest a relevant role in the reproductive physiology of C. d. terrificus.

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