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Seasonal Dynamics of СO2 Emission from Soils of Kursk

Authors
  • Nevedrov, N. P.1
  • Sarzhanov, D. A.2
  • Protsenko, E. P.1
  • Vasenev, I. I.2
  • 1 Kursk State University, ul. Radishcheva 33, Kursk, 305000, Russia , Kursk (Russia)
  • 2 Russian State Agrarian University–Timiryazev Agricultural Academy, ul. Timiryazevskaya 49, Moscow, 127550, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Eurasian Soil Science
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
54
Issue
1
Pages
80–88
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S1064229321010117
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

AbstractThe spatiotemporal variability of CO2 emission from soils of Kursk under different land uses, pollution levels, and soil geneses has been assessed. Data on the seasonal dynamics of CO2 emissions in background (forested recreational areas) and urban soils under the anthropogenic impact are presented. Seasonal dynamics of soil СО2 emission depends on a number of factors: season, type of soil, organic matter content, anthropogenic modifications of soil profiles, hydrothermic conditions, and heavy metal pollution. Soil hydrothermic conditions to a greater extent determine the intensity and characteristics of the seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 emission with a maximum in summer. In anthropogenic soils, multidirectional transformation of soil CO2 emissions is noted. The intensity of CO2 emission from soils of various geneses is quite different. Heavy metal pollution of the soil has an ambiguous effect on the CO2 emission processes. The CO2 emission rate from Urbic Technosol increased by 16.4% in comparison with that from the background Luvic Chernozem (Loamic, Pachic), while for Technic Greyzemic Phaeozem (Loamic) this parameter decreased by 47% in comparison with the background Greyzemic Phaeozem (Loamic). In Carbic Podzols polluted by heavy metals, the averaged CO2 emissions are generally similar to those from the background soils unpolluted by heavy metals.

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