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Screening for Traumatic Experiences and Mental Health Distress Among Women in HIV Care in Cape Town, South Africa.

Authors
  • Yemeke, Tatenda T1
  • Sikkema, Kathleen J1, 2
  • Watt, Melissa H1
  • Ciya, Nonceba2
  • Robertson, Corne2
  • Joska, John A2
  • 1 Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
  • 2 University of Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of interpersonal violence
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2020
Volume
35
Issue
21-22
Pages
4842–4862
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0886260517718186
PMID: 29294819
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Traumatic events can negatively affect clinical outcomes among HIV positive women, particularly when those events result in ongoing psychological distress. Consequently, there have been calls to integrate screening and treatment of traumatic experiences and associated mental health disorders into HIV care. In South Africa, screening for traumatic experiences and mental health is not a routine part of HIV care. The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence of traumatic experiences and mental health distress among women in an HIV clinic in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore the acceptability of routine screening in this setting. Seventy HIV positive women were screened following referral from health care workers in the clinic. Among the participants, 51% reported a history of sexual abuse and 75% reported physical intimate partner violence (physical IPV). Among all participants, 36% met screening criteria for depression; among those with traumatic experiences (n = 57), 70% met screening criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Compared with reporting no sexual abuse or physical IPV, having experienced both sexual abuse and physical IPV was significantly associated with higher odds of depression, while reporting either sexual abuse or physical IPV individually was not significantly associated with increased odds of depression. Among women reporting sexual abuse, 61% were disclosing their experience for the first time during the screening; 31% of women with physical IPV experience were disclosing for the first time. Overall, 98% of participants thought screening should be routine and extended to all women as part of clinic care. Screening women for sexual abuse and physical IPV may be an important component of ensuring HIV care engagement.

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