Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

A Screen of the Conserved Kinome for Negative Regulators of LIN-12 Negative Regulatory Region ("NRR")-Missense Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Authors
  • Deng, Yuting1
  • Luo, Katherine Leisan2
  • Shaye, Daniel D1
  • Greenwald, Iva3
  • 1 Dept. of Biological Sciences and.
  • 2 Integrated Program in Cellular, Molecular and Biophysical Studies, Columbia University, NY 10027.
  • 3 Dept. of Biological Sciences and [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
G3 Genes|Genome|Genetics
Publisher
The Genetics Society of America
Publication Date
Nov 05, 2019
Volume
9
Issue
11
Pages
3567–3574
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1534/g3.119.400471
PMID: 31519743
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Genetic analysis of LIN-12/Notch signaling in C . elegans has provided many insights into human biology. Activating missense mutations in the Negative Regulatory Region (NRR) of the ectodomain of LIN-12/Notch were first described in C. elegans, and similar mutations in human Notch were later found to cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The ubiquitin ligase sel-10 /Fbw7 is the prototype of a conserved negative regulator of lin-12 /Notch that was first defined by loss-of-function mutations that enhance lin-12 NRR-missense activity in C. elegans, and then demonstrated to regulate Notch activity in mammalian cells and to be a bona fide tumor suppressor in T-ALL. Here, we report the results of an RNAi screen of 248 C. elegans protein kinase-encoding genes with human orthologs for enhancement of a weakly activating NRR-missense mutation of lin-12 in the Vulval Precursor Cells. We identified, and validated, thirteen kinase genes whose loss led to increase lin-12 activity; eleven of these genes have never been implicated previously in regulating Notch activity in any system. Depleting the activity of five kinase genes (cdk-8, wnk-1, kin-3, hpo-11, and mig-15) also significantly enhanced the activity of a transgene in which heterologous sequences drive expression of the untethered intracellular domain of LIN-12, suggesting that they increase the activity or stability of the signal-transducing form of LIN-12/Notch. Precedents set by other regulators of lin-12 /Notch defined through genetic interactions in C. elegans suggest that this new set of genes may include negative regulators that are functionally relevant to mammalian development and cancer. Copyright © 2019 Deng et al.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times