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Scott Emergency Escape Breathing Device evaluation for use by aircraft cabin crew and passengers.

Authors
  • Martin, N A
  • Popplow, J R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Publisher
Aerospace Medical Association
Publication Date
Aug 01, 1987
Volume
58
Issue
8
Pages
747–753
Identifiers
PMID: 3632533
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The Scott Emergency Escape Breathing Device (EEBD) was evaluated for use in Canadian Forces (CF) transport/passenger aircraft in providing smoke protection during emergencies and in preventing hypoxia during cabin decompression at high altitude. Five human subjects wearing the EEBD were subjected to decompression from 2,438 m (8,000 ft) to 9,753 m (32,000 ft) in approximately 15 s followed by a free fall to 7,010 m (23,000 ft) in a challenge gas atmosphere of 5,000 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), where they performed moderate exercise (80 W output) on a bicycle ergometer. Very little in-leakage of CO was observed when the neck seal was maintained. Hood atmosphere was measured at 97% oxygen at 7,010 m, which resulted in an arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) of 97%. Temperature in the hood rose to as high as 45.5 degrees C but the subjects were able to function normally. The EEBD is effective in providing noncockpit aircraft crew with smoke protection, adequate vision, and hypoxia prevention for at least 15 min in the event of a fire, smoke, or decompression emergencies at altitudes up to 7,010 m following a brief exposure to 9,753 m.

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