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Schizosaccharomyces osmophilus sp. nov., an osmophilic fission yeast occurring in bee bread of different solitary bee species.

Authors
  • Brysch-Herzberg, Michael1
  • Tobias, Andrea2
  • Seidel, Martin1
  • Wittmann, Rupert1
  • Wohlmann, Elke3
  • Fischer, Reinhard3
  • Dlauchy, Dénes2
  • Peter, Gabor2
  • 1 Laboratory for Wine Microbiology, Department International Business, Heilbronn University, Max-Planck-Str. 39, 74081 Heilbronn, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 National Collection of Agricultural and Industrial Microorganisms, Faculty of Food Science, Szent István University, Somlói út 14-16. H-1118 Budapest, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 3 Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Institute for Applied Bioscience, Department of Microbiology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 4, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
FEMS Yeast Research
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/femsyr/foz038
PMID: 31132130
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Eight yeast strains that asexually reproduce by cell fission were isolated from bee bread of different solitary bees in Germany. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the strains shared the same sequence in the D1/D2 domain of the nuclear large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene with a strain that was previously isolated from a fig snack from Spain. The closest related type strain was that of Schizosaccharomyces octosporus, which showed 98.2% sequence similarity (11 substitutions) with the new strains. By clone sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, and ITS2) a total of nine different copy types were identified. The new strains differed from S. octosporus by approximately 31% in the ITS region. Sequence analysis of the RNAse P gene further supported the description of a new species. The strains isolated during this study show some phenotypic characteristics that separate them from the closest related species, S. octosporus and S. cryophilus. Since all strains showed true osmophily the name of the new species is S. osmophilus (holotype: CBS 15793T; isotype: CLIB 3267 T = NCAIM Y.02225 T, MycoBank no.: MB829586). © FEMS 2019.

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