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Safeness of Diets Based on Gluten-Free Buckwheat Bread Enriched with Seeds and Nuts—Effect on Oxidative and Biochemical Parameters in Rat Serum

Authors
  • Świeca, Michal1
  • Regula, Julita
  • Suliburska, Joanna
  • Zlotek, Urszula1
  • Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula1
  • Ferreira, Isabel M. P. L. V. O.
  • 1 (U.G.-D.)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Dec 22, 2019
Volume
12
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12010041
PMID: 31877881
PMCID: PMC7019513
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Buckwheat breads enriched with seeds (e.g., poppy, carum, amaranth, sunflower, and pumpkin) and nuts can be excellent sources of selected macro- and microelements and bioactive components, such as phenolics, essential oils, unsaturated fatty acids, fiber, and vitamins; however, no studies described their impacts on body biochemical parameters and antioxidant status. The aim of this study was to a determine the safety (the analyses of blood morphological and biochemical parameters) of short-term diets based on buckwheat breads supplemented with the commonly used functional ingredients. Additionally, we confirmed the usefulness of these fortified breads in a reduction of blood cholesterol and triacylglycerols, as well as an improvement of in vivo antioxidant status of Wistar rats. Enriched breads presented an increased phenolic content; however, it has not been translated into an elevation of antioxidant capacities. During short-term in vivo experiments, the studied breads increased the body mass of the rats, except the control buckwheat bread. Compared to the control, the poppy-milk bread markedly lowered (–23%) and egg yolk–carum bread significantly increased (+17%) the total cholesterol concentration in serum. All the fortified breads decreased triacylglycerols’ levels by about 50%. Bread enriched with the poppy–milk, milk-seed, egg yolk–carum, and a mix of additives decreased superoxide dismutase activity by 68%, 66%, 73%, and 71%, respectively. Catalase activity was significantly decreased in the rats fed with carum bread (–62%) and markedly increased in the groups fed with egg yolk–carum bread (+89%), hazel nuts–amaranth bread (+72%), and milk–seeds bread (+65%). The results confirmed the usefulness and safety of functional additives in buckwheat breads.

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