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Runaway Kaposi Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication correlates with systemic IL-10 levels.

Authors
  • Caro-Vegas, Carolina1
  • Sellers, Subhashini2
  • Host, Kurtis M1
  • Seltzer, Jedediah1
  • Landis, Justin1
  • Fischer, William A 2nd2
  • Damania, Blossom1
  • Dittmer, Dirk P3
  • 1 UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 450 West Drive, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
  • 2 Division of Pulmonary Diseases and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
  • 3 UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 450 West Drive, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Virology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 02, 2020
Volume
539
Pages
18–25
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2019.10.002
PMID: 31629226
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

KSHV-associated inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). KICS is associated with high-level, systemic replication of KSHV. This study characterized the clinical and virologic features of a KICS patient over time. Additionally, it compared the cytokine profiles of the KICS case to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) (n = 11) and non-KS (n = 6) cases. This KICS case presented with elevated levels of KSHV and IL-10, as expected. Surprisingly, this case did not have elevated levels of IL-6 or human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Nevertheless, treatment with anti-IL6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab) reduced KSHV viral load and IL-10. The KSHV genome sequence showed no significant changes over time, except in ORF24. Phylogenetic analysis established this isolate as belonging to KSHV clade A and closely related to other US isolates. These findings suggest IL-10 as potential biomarker and therapy target for KICS. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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