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Rumen bacterial diversity of Tibetan sheep (Ovis aries) associated with different forage types on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

Authors
  • Cui, Xiongxiong1
  • Wang, Zhaofeng1
  • Yan, Tianhai2
  • Chang, Shenghua1
  • Wang, Hong3
  • Hou, Fujiang1
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-ecosystems; Key Laboratory of Grassland Livestock Industry Innovation, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs; College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China. , (China)
  • 2 Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK. , (Ireland)
  • 3 Animal Husbandry Science and Technology Demonstration Park of Maqu County, Gannan, Gansu Province, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Journal of Microbiology
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2019
Volume
65
Issue
12
Pages
859–869
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2019-0154
PMID: 31386822
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Diet is the great determinant of bacterial composition in the rumen. However, little is known about the rumen bacterial community of Tibetan sheep living in the special ecological environment of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) of China. In the present study, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the rumen bacterial community of Tibetan sheep associated with two primary diets: alpine pasture diet (a continuation of the sheep's natural grazing diet) and oat (Avena sativa) hay diet on the QTP. The results showed that bacterial community richness and species diversity of the oat hay diet group were significantly greater than that of the native pasture diet group (p < 0.05). Principal co-ordinate analysis and analysis of similarities revealed that the bacterial community of the oat hay diet group was distinctly different from that of the native pasture diet group (p < 0.05). Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the predominant microbial phyla in the rumen. The rumen of oat-hay-fed sheep had higher proportions of Proteobacteria and novel bacteria species than the rumen of native-pasture-fed sheep. Actinobacteria, an uncommon bacterial phylum, occurred only in the oat-hay-fed group. At the genus level, Komagataeibacter, Ruminococcaceae_UCG-014, and Ruminococcaceae_NK4A214 showed significantly higher relative abundance in the oat-hay-fed sheep than in the native-pasture-fed sheep (p < 0.05). This study is the first of the QTP to employ high-throughput sequencing to examine the influence of diet on the rumen microbiome of Tibetan sheep.

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