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Rubbing your stomach while tapping your fingers: interference between motor planning and semantic judgments.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
Publication Date
Volume
18
Issue
4
Pages
948–961
Identifiers
PMID: 1431757
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Previous research (Klatzky et al., 1989) shows that the time required to make sensible/nonsensible judgments about an action-object phrase (e.g., "rub your stomach") is reliably faster when the phrase is preceded by a cure representing a specific prototypical hand shape (vs. a neutral cue). The current experiments investigated the effects of preparing for an alternate task (finger tapping vs. syllable vocalization) on facilitatory priming of sensibility judgments. Preparation for finger tapping reduced the magnitude of the priming effect more than preparation for vocalization, suggesting that resources accessed during semantic processing of action-object phrases are also used during manual response preparation. The results support the existence of a system representing manual actions that is limited in the number of activities that can be represented at one time and that is not so general that it represents manual and vocal tract movements.

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