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Rotavirus vaccination for all children or subgroups only? Comment of the European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP) and the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID) recommendation group for rotavirus vaccination.

Authors
  • Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen1
  • Vesikari, Timo2
  • Guarino, Alfredo3
  • LoVecchio, Andrea3
  • Hadjipanayis, Adamos4, 5
  • Koletzko, Berthold6
  • 1 Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. , (Austria)
  • 2 Nordic Research Network, Biokatu 10, 33520, Tampere, Finland. , (Finland)
  • 3 Department of Translational Medical Sciences - Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 Department of Paediatrics, Larnaca General Hospital, Larnaca, Cyprus. [email protected] , (Cyprus)
  • 5 Medical School, European University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus. [email protected] , (Cyprus)
  • 6 Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Munich, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Journal of Pediatrics
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
179
Issue
9
Pages
1489–1493
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00431-020-03608-5
PMID: 32088742
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rotavirus gastroenteritis affects all children. Studies indicate that by the age of 5 years, almost all children have developed rotavirus antibodies. It has been estimated that in Europe, approximately 6550 children each year die as a result of rotavirus infection. Most of this mortality does not affect children from identifiable risk groups, but previously healthy infants. There is no accountable evidence on increased severity of rotavirus infection in specific risk groups, including children previously born preterm or immunocompromised children. Universal immunization in areas that have successfully achieved large coverage has greatly improved the health of children, reducing infection rates, hospitalization, and costs. Vaccination of infants with presumed high risk may be beneficial for the vaccinated individuals, and such a strategy may also be cost-effective in certain settings. Identifying all high-risk infants within the first few weeks of life is rather difficult especially in countries without primary care pediatricians and goes along with additional costs.Conclusion: Rotavirus vaccines should be recommended as a universal approach for all children and not be restricted to subgroups with assumed increased risk. Targeted vaccination could be considered as an option in countries with limited financial resources.

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