Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Roles of human beta-defensins in innate immune defense at the ocular surface: arming and alarming corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Histochemistry and cell biology
Publication Date
Volume
134
Issue
1
Pages
59–73
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00418-010-0713-y
PMID: 20526610
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Human beta-defensins are cationic peptides produced by epithelial cells that have been proposed to be an important component of immune function at mucosal surfaces. In this study, the expression and inducibility of beta-defensins at the ocular surface were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Expression of human beta-defensins (hBD) was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in tissues of the ocular surface and lacrimal apparatus. Cultured corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines and supernatants of different ocular pathogens. Real-time PCR and ELISA experiments were performed to study the effect on the inducibility of hBD2 and 3. Expression and inducibility of mouse beta-defensins-2, -3 and -4 (mBD2-4) were tested in a mouse ocular surface scratch model with and without treatment of supernatants of a clinical Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolate by means of immunohistochemistry. Here we show that hBD1, -2, -3 and -4 are constitutively expressed in conjunctival epithelial cells and also partly in cornea. Healthy tissues of the ocular surface, lacrimal apparatus and human tears contain measurable amounts of hBD2 and -3, with highest concentrations in cornea and much lower concentrations in all other tissues, especially tears, suggesting intraepithelial storage of beta-defensins. Exposure of cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells to proinflammatory cytokines and supernatants of various bacteria revealed that IL-1beta is a very strong inductor of hBD2 and Staphylococcus aureus increases both hBD2 and hBD3 production in corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. A murine corneal scratch model demonstrated that beta-defensins are only induced if microbial products within the tear film come into contact with a defective epithelium. Our finding suggests that the tear film per se contains so much antimicrobial substances that epithelial induction of beta-defensins occurs only as a result of ocular surface damage. These findings widen our knowledge of the distribution, amount and inducibility of beta-defensins at the ocular surface and lacrimal apparatus and show how beta-defensins are regulated specifically.

Statistics

Seen <100 times