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The Role of Urinary Calcium and Chitotriosidase in a Cohort of Chronic Sarcoidosis Patients

Authors
  • Cameli, Paolo
  • Gonnelli, Stefano
  • Bargagli, Elena
  • d’Alessandro, Miriana
  • Bergantini, Laura
  • Favetta, Valentina
  • Tomai Pitinca, Maria Dea
  • Lisi, Edoardo
  • Refini, Rosa Metella
  • Pieroni, Maria
  • Sestini, Piersante
  • Caffarelli, Carla
Type
Published Article
Journal
Respiration
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Feb 28, 2020
Volume
99
Issue
3
Pages
207–212
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000505653
PMID: 32114588
Source
Karger
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Background: Calcium metabolism alterations are quite common in sarcoidosis and have been correlated with disease activity. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical significance of calcium metabolism alterations in patients with chronic sarcoidosis. We paid particular attention to associations with specific disease phenotypes and chitotriosidase (CTO) expression. Methods: 212 chronic sarcoidosis patients (mean age 56.07 ± 12 years; 97 males) were retrospectively recruited. Demographic, clinical, functional, and radiological data, and serum-urinary calcium metabolism were entered into an electronical database for analysis. Levels of CTO and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were measured and bone mineral density and lung function tests were conducted. Results: Hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia were observed in 18.8 and 1.8% of patients, respectively. Urinary calcium levels correlated with CTO activity (r = 0.33, p = 0.0042). Patients with worsening persistent disease showed the highest levels of urinary calcium. Diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D<sub>LCO</sub>) percentage correlated inversely with urinary calcium (r = 0.1482; p = 0.0397). Conclusions: Calcium metabolism alteration, particularly hypercalciuria, was observed in a significant percentage of patients of sarcoidosis. Urinary calcium was correlated with clinical status, D<sub>LCO</sub>, and serum CTO activity, suggesting its potential role as a biomarker of the activity and severity of sarcoidosis.

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