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Role of Streptococcus mutans two-component systems in antimicrobial peptide resistance in the oral cavity.

Authors
  • Kawada-Matsuo, Miki1
  • Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi1
  • 1 Department of Oral Microbiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima 890-8544, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Japanese dental science review
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2017
Volume
53
Issue
3
Pages
86–94
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jdsr.2016.12.002
PMID: 28725299
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Approximately 100 trillion microorganisms exist in the oral cavity. For the commensal bacteria of the oral cavity, it is important to adapt to environmental stimuli, including human- or bacteria-derived antimicrobial agents. Recently, bacterial-specific signal transduction regulatory systems, called two-component systems (TCSs), which appear to be focused on sensing and adapting to the environment, were discovered. Streptococcus mutans is an oral commensal bacteria and is also known as a cariogenic bacteria. Although the virulence factors of S. mutans have been well demonstrated, the mechanism underlying the adaptation of the species to the oral cavity is poorly understood. S. mutans UA159 has 15 sets of TCSs. Among them, several have been demonstrated to be involved in acid tolerance, competence and biofilm formation. Recently, together with our findings, it was demonstrated that 5 TCSs were involved in resistance to antimicrobial agents. Furthermore, another TCS was associated with the production of bacteriocin. Six of 15 TCSs are associated with antimicrobial agents, implying that S. mutans can survive in the oral cavity by resisting various antimicrobial peptides. In this review, we highlight the role of antimicrobial peptides in the oral cavity.

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