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The Role of Pretreatment Expectancy on Substance Use Outcomes in Women Mandated to Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention.

Authors
  • Somohano, Vanessa C1
  • Shank, Taylor2
  • Manuel, Jacob2
  • Mallik, Debesh2
  • Rehder, Kristoffer1, 2
  • Bowen, Sarah2
  • 1 VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, USA.
  • 2 School of Graduate Psychology, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2021
Volume
27
Issue
12
Pages
1147–1155
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/acm.2021.0123
PMID: 34516782
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background: More than one-third of justice-involved individuals meet the criteria for substance use disorder (SUD). Many studies show that treatment expectancy predicts longitudinal SUD outcomes; however, results are inconsistent, and the role of treatment expectancy on SUD outcomes for individuals mandated to a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) is unknown. Mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) has shown efficacy with justice-involved populations; however, enrollment in MBRP is typically voluntary. The current study assessed whether pretreatment expectancy predicted SUD- and affect-related outcomes in a sample of women (n = 54) mandated to MBRP as part of their residential SUD programming. Method: The authors employed a quasiexperimental design and administered measures at pre-, mid-, and postcourse. Results: Following mandatory participation in MBRP, significant reductions in craving and substance use were observed. However, contrary to hypotheses, higher pretreatment expectancy predicted greater substance dependence at postcourse. Conclusions: Positive treatment expectancy within the context of an MBI was not related to favorable posttreatment outcomes; in fact, it was related to higher postcourse substance dependence. This suggests that MBIs may be suitable for mandated individuals who may not have voluntarily chosen to participate in such an intervention, and thus may have lower expectancy for the treatment. This finding needs to be replicated in a larger sample to warrant a firmer conclusion.

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