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Role of Mast Cells in Shaping the Tumor Microenvironment.

Authors
  • Komi, Daniel Elieh Ali1, 2
  • Redegeld, Frank A3
  • 1 Immunology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 2 Department of Immunology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 3 Division of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands. [email protected] , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
58
Issue
3
Pages
313–325
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12016-019-08753-w
PMID: 31256327
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Early mast cell (MC) infiltration has been reported in a wide range of human and animal tumors particularly malignant melanoma and breast and colorectal cancer. The consequences of their presence in the tumor microenvironment (TME) or at their margins still remain unclear as it is associated with a good or poor prognosis based on the type and anatomical site of the tumor. Within the tumor, MC interactions occur with infiltrated immune cells, tumor cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM) through direct cell-to-cell interactions or release of a broad range of mediators capable of remodeling the TME. MCs actively contribute to angiogenesis and induce neovascularization by releasing the classical proangiogenic factors including VEGF, FGF-2, PDGF, and IL-6, and nonclassical proangiogenic factors mainly proteases including tryptase and chymase. MCs support tumor invasiveness by releasing a broad range of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MC presence within the tumor gained additional significance when it was assumed that controlling its activation by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib and masitinib) and tryptase inhibitors (gabexate and nafamostat mesylate) or controlling their interactions with other cell types may have therapeutic benefit.

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