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The role of haemostasis in placenta-mediated complications.

Authors
  • Gris, Jean-Christophe1
  • Bouvier, Sylvie2
  • Cochery-Nouvellon, Éva3
  • Mercier, Éric2
  • Mousty, Ève4
  • Pérez-Martin, Antonia5
  • 1 Department of Haematology, Nîmes University Hospital, France; University of Montpellier, France; The First I.M. Sechenov Moscow State Medical University, Russian Federation. Electronic address: [email protected] , (France)
  • 2 Department of Haematology, Nîmes University Hospital, France; University of Montpellier, France. , (France)
  • 3 Department of Haematology, Nîmes University Hospital, France. , (France)
  • 4 Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Nîmes University Hospital, France. , (France)
  • 5 University of Montpellier, France; Department of Vascular Imaging and Vascular Medicine, Nîmes University Hospital, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Thrombosis research
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2019
Volume
181 Suppl 1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/S0049-3848(19)30359-7
PMID: 31477220
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Normal pregnancy is associated with an increasing state of activation of the haemostatic system. This activation state is excessive in women with placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (PMPCs), including preeclampsia (PE). Platelet activation plays a crucial pathophysiological role in PE. The very early activation of coagulation in the intervillous space is mandatory for placental growth and morphogenesis but its excesses and/or inadequate control may participate to the emergence of the trophoblastic phenotype of PE. Extracellular vesicles, of endothelial but also of trophoblastic origin, can favour key cellular reactions of preeclampsia, acting as proactive cofactors. The understanding of this intricate relationship between haemostasis activation and PMPCs may provide interesting keys for new pathophysiological therapeutic developments. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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