Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Role of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Papillomavirus Coinfection in Cervical Cancer: Epidemiology, Mechanisms and Perspectives

Authors
  • Blanco, Rancés1
  • Carrillo-Beltrán, Diego1
  • Osorio, Julio C.
  • Calaf, Gloria M2
  • Aguayo, Francisco3, 4
  • 1 (D.C.-B.)
  • 2 Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
  • 3 Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica 1000000, Chile
  • 4 Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pathogens
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Aug 21, 2020
Volume
9
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens9090685
PMID: 32839399
PMCID: PMC7557835
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is etiologically associated with the development and progression of cervical cancer, although other factors are involved. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) detection in premalignant and malignant tissues from uterine cervix has been widely reported; however, its contribution to cervical cancer development is still unclear. Here, a comprehensive analysis regarding EBV presence and its potential role in cervical cancer, the frequency of EBV/HR-HPV coinfection in uterine cervix and EBV infection in tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes were revised. Overall, reports suggest a potential link of EBV to the development of cervical carcinomas in two possible pathways: (1) Infecting epithelial cells, thus synergizing with HR-HPV (direct pathway), and/or (2) infecting tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes that could generate local immunosuppression (indirect pathway). In situ hybridization (ISH) and/or immunohistochemical methods are mandatory for discriminating the cell type infected by EBV. However, further studies are needed for a better understanding of the EBV/HR-HPV coinfection role in cervical carcinogenesis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times