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Role of Chondroitin Sulfation Following Spinal Cord Injury.

Authors
  • Hussein, Rowan K1
  • Mencio, Caitlin P1
  • Katagiri, Yasuhiro1
  • Brake, Alexis M1
  • Geller, Herbert M1
  • 1 Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, Cell and Developmental Biology Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
14
Pages
208–208
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fncel.2020.00208
PMID: 32848612
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Traumatic spinal cord injury produces long-term neurological damage, and presents a significant public health problem with nearly 18,000 new cases per year in the U.S. The injury results in both acute and chronic changes in the spinal cord, ultimately resulting in the production of a glial scar, consisting of multiple cells including fibroblasts, macrophages, microglia, and reactive astrocytes. Within the scar, there is an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules-primarily tenascins and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs)-which are considered to be inhibitory to axonal regeneration. In this review article, we discuss the role of CSPGs in the injury response, especially how sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains act to inhibit plasticity and regeneration. This includes how sulfation of GAG chains influences their biological activity and interactions with potential receptors. Comprehending the role of CSPGs in the inhibitory properties of the glial scar provides critical knowledge in the much-needed production of new therapies. Copyright © 2020 Hussein, Mencio, Katagiri, Brake and Geller.

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