Affordable Access

The role of amine oxidases in xenobiotic metabolism.

Authors
  • Gong, Bin
  • Boor, Paul J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Expert opinion on drug metabolism & toxicology
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2006
Volume
2
Issue
4
Pages
559–571
Identifiers
PMID: 16859404
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The amine oxidases of mammalian tissues are a heterogeneous family of enzymes that metabolise various monoamines, diamines and polyamines produced endogenously, or being absorbed as dietary or xenobiotic substances. The heterogeneous class of amine oxidases can be divided on an arbitrary basis of the chemical nature of their cofactors into two types. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) and an intracellular form of polyamine oxidase (PAO) contain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as their cofactor, whereas a second group of amine oxidases without FAD contain a cofactor possessing one or more carbonyl groups, making them sensitive to inhibition by carbonyl reagents such as semicarbazide; this group includes semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) and the connective tissue enzyme, lysyl oxidase. This article focuses on the general aspects of MAO's contribution to the metabolism of foreign toxic substances including toxins and illegal drugs. Another main objective of this review is to discuss the properties of PAO and SSAO and their involvement in the metabolism of xenobiotics.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times