Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Risks of Comorbidities in Patients With Palmoplantar Pustulosis vs Patients With Psoriasis Vulgaris or Pompholyx in Korea.

Authors
  • Kim, Dong Hyo1, 2
  • Lee, Jin Yong3, 4
  • Cho, Soo Ick1, 2
  • Jo, Seong Jin1, 2
  • 1 Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Public Healthcare Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Department of Health Policy and Management, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
JAMA dermatology
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2022
Volume
158
Issue
6
Pages
650–660
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2022.1081
PMID: 35476054
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) has been reported to be accompanied by systemic conditions. However, the risks of comorbidities in patients with PPP have rarely been evaluated. To assess the risks of comorbidities in patients with PPP compared with patients with psoriasis vulgaris or pompholyx. This nationwide population-based cross-sectional study used data from the Korean National Health Insurance database and the National Health Screening Program collected from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2019. Data were analyzed from July 1, 2020, to October 31, 2021. Korean patients diagnosed with PPP, psoriasis vulgaris, or pompholyx who visited a dermatologist between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2019, were enrolled. Presence of PPP. The risks of comorbidities among patients with PPP vs patients with psoriasis vulgaris or pompholyx were evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression model. A total of 37 399 patients with PPP (mean [SD] age, 48.98 [17.20] years; 51.7% female), 332 279 patients with psoriasis vulgaris (mean [SD] age, 47.29 [18.34] years; 58.7% male), and 365 415 patients with pompholyx (mean [SD] age, 40.92 [17.63] years; 57.4% female) were included in the analyses. Compared with patients with pompholyx, those with PPP had significantly higher risks of developing psoriasis vulgaris (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 72.96; 95% CI, 68.19-78.05; P < .001), psoriatic arthritis (aOR, 8.06; 95% CI, 6.55-9.92; P < .001), ankylosing spondylitis (aOR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.61-2.27; P < .001), type 1 diabetes (aOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.16-1.52; P < .001), type 2 diabetes (aOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.29-1.38; P < .001), Graves disease (aOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11-1.42; P < .001), Crohn disease (aOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.11-2.40; P = .01), and vitiligo (aOR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.65-2.12; P < .001) after adjusting for demographic covariates. The risks of ankylosing spondylitis (aOR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.16-1.62; P < .001) and Graves disease (aOR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.23-1.58; P < .001) were significantly higher among patients with PPP vs psoriasis vulgaris. However, the risks of psoriatic arthritis (aOR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47-0.63; P < .001), systemic lupus erythematosus (aOR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.46-0.97; P = .04), Sjögren syndrome (aOR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50-0.96; P = .03), systemic sclerosis (aOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.11-0.77; P = .01), vitiligo (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.47-0.60; P < .001), and alopecia areata (aOR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; P = .001) were significantly lower among those with PPP vs psoriasis vulgaris. The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that patients with PPP have an overlapping comorbidity profile with patients with psoriasis vulgaris but not patients with pompholyx. However, the risks of comorbidities among patients with PPP may be substantially different from those among patients with psoriasis vulgaris.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times