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Risk Profiles of Women Experiencing Initial and Repeat Incarcerations: Implications for Prevention Programs.

Authors
  • Herbst, Jeffrey H1
  • Branscomb-Burgess, Olivia2
  • Gelaude, Deborah J3
  • Seth, Puja3
  • Parker, Sharon4
  • Fogel, Catherine I5
  • 1 Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia. , (Georgia)
  • 2 Department of Criminal Justice, University of Georgia. , (Georgia)
  • 3 Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, CDC.
  • 4 Department of Social Work, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • 5 FAAN School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS education and prevention : official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2016
Volume
28
Issue
4
Pages
299–311
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1521/aeap.2016.28.4.299
PMID: 27427925
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Incarcerated women experience myriad individual, interpersonal, and structural factors leading to arrest and rearrest. This study examined risk profiles of women experiencing initial and repeat incarcerations. The sample included 521 women recruited from two prisons in North Carolina and enrolled in a HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention trial. Variables included socio-demographics, structural/economic factors, sexual and substance use behaviors, STDs, victimization history, and depressive symptoms. Bivariate and multivariable analyses identified risk differences. Compared to women incarcerated for the first time, women with repeat incarcerations reported significantly greater economic instability, substance use and sexual risk behaviors, laboratory-confirmed STDs, and victimization during childhood and adulthood. Multivariable logistic regression found women with repeat incarcerations experienced greater unstable housing, injection drug use, crack cocaine use, concurrent sex partners, and childhood sexual victimization. Findings can inform the development of prevention programs by addressing economic instability, sexual risk, and substance use among women prisoners.

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