Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Rhodiola crenulata Attenuates γ-Ray Induced Cellular Injury via Modulation of Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

Authors
  • Lin, Kuen-Tze1, 2
  • Chang, Tsu-Chung3
  • Lai, Feng-Yi4
  • Lin, Chun-Shu2
  • Chao, Hsing-Lung2
  • Lee, Shih-Yu1, 4
  • 1 * Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
  • 2 † Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
  • 3 ‡ Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
  • 4 § Graduate Institute of Aerospace and Undersea Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of Chinese medicine
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
46
Issue
1
Pages
175–190
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1142/S0192415X18500106
PMID: 29298516
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Skin injury is a major complication during radiation therapy and is associated with oxidative damage to skin cells. An effective and safe radioprotectant to prevent this skin damage is still unavailable. The Rhodiola crenulata root extract (RCE) has been reported to be a free radical scavenger and a potent anti-oxidant in both in vitro and in vivo models. In the current study, we investigated the effects of RCE on ionizing radiation-induced skin injury and its underlying mechanisms. HaCaT cells - a non-cancerous skin cell line together with HepG2, Caco2, A549, and OECM cancer cell lines - were pre-treated with RCE for 24[Formula: see text]h followed by exposure to 15 Gy using Caesium-137 as a γ-ray source. The cell viability was measured. In HaCaT cells, oxidative stress markers, cellular apoptosis pathways, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression were studied. We found that RCE significantly protected HaCaT cells, but not cancer cells from the loss of viability induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. RCE attenuated radiation-induced oxidative stress markers, cell apoptosis, MMP levels, and expression of cytokine genes. RCE also limited the induction of p53 and p21 by radiation exposure. These findings indicate that RCE may selectively protect the skin cells from ionizing radiation without altering its ability to kill cancer cells. Therefore, we suggest that RCE or its derivatives could serve as a novel radioprotective therapy.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times