Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Rhipicephalus microplus, babesiosis and anaplasmosis in Uruguay: current situation and control or elimination programs on farms.

Authors
  • Miraballes, Cecilia1
  • Aráoz, Virginia2
  • Riet-Correa, Franklin2
  • 1 Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Plataforma de Salud Animal, Estación Experimental INIA Tacuarembó, Ruta 5 km 386, CP 45000, Tacuarembó, Uruguay. [email protected] , (Uruguay)
  • 2 Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Plataforma de Salud Animal, Estación Experimental INIA Tacuarembó, Ruta 5 km 386, CP 45000, Tacuarembó, Uruguay. , (Uruguay)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental and Applied Acarology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2019
Volume
78
Issue
4
Pages
579–593
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10493-019-00405-0
PMID: 31352648
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rhipicephalus microplus causes high economic losses for Uruguay; the country is divided into a R. microplus-free area and an endemic area. The aim of this research was to evaluate the R. microplus and tick fever situation in Uruguay and the feasibility of implementing R. microplus control or elimination programs to reduce the number of infested farms. A representative survey was performed to determine the number of infested farms, the number of farms with outbreaks of tick fever and the control and preventive measures being used. Control or elimination programs using generational treatment were implemented on 30 farms. Previously, a situation diagnosis was performed by evaluating the background of each farm, identifying acaricide resistance, serologically evaluating the enzootic stability of tick fever, and analyzing the risk of R. microplus introduction to farms. According to the survey, R. microplus was present on 9544 (36%) farms, and 3436 (36%) of these farms experienced outbreaks of tick fever. Only 323 (9.4%) farmers used the tick fever vaccine. Of the 30 farms for which control or elimination programs were carried out, 18 reduced the number of treatments applied per year and six achieved the elimination of the cattle tick. It is concluded that by administering elimination or control programs, it is possible to reduce the number of infested farms and the number of treatments to maintain control. New surveys should be performed to measure the degree of technology adoption by farmers and to analyze the advances in tick control or elimination programs on farms.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times