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Revision of Plioperdix (Aves: Phasianidae) from the Plio-Pleistocene of Ukraine

Authors
  • Zelenkov, N. V.1
  • Gorobets, L. V.2
  • 1 Borrisiak Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 117647, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 2 National Museum of Natural History of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, 01030, Ukraine , Kiev (Ukraine)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Paleontological Journal
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
54
Issue
5
Pages
531–541
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S0031030120050159
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Abstract—Remains of small phasianid birds from several Pliocene and Pleistocene localities in the Northern Black Sea Region and Eastern Europe (Ukraine, Moldova, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary) are traditionally, based on similar proportions, assigned to Plioperdix pontica (Tugarinov, 1940). Our study of the bone material from Ukraine has shown that they in fact belong to several taxa of Galliformes. The remains from the localities of the Kuchurganian faunal assemblage (MN 14) can be attributed to Eurobambusicola turolicus Zelenkov, 2016, and supposedly to “Plioperdix” hungarica (Jánossy, 1991). Plioperdix pontica is characterized by morphological similarity to modern Coturnix and is represented mainly by bone remains from the Odessa catacombs locality (upper part of Zone MN 15) and several localities of Zone MN 16, including Rębielice Królewskie-2 (Poland). In the Middle Villafranchian localities (for example, Kotlovina; as well as Etulia-3, Moldova; Zone MN 17) remains of another unnamed form, which reliably differs from P. pontica in most skeletal elements, prevail. Previous descriptions and diagnoses of Plioperdix pontica, which were based on mixed bone materials of various taxa, are revised. Problems of the taxonomy of small Neogene–Pleistocene phasianids from the Northern Black Sea region and Eastern Europe are discussed.

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