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Review of what youth programs do to increase the connectedness of youth with adults.

Authors
  • Grossman, Jean B
  • Bulle, Meridel J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Adolescent Health
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2006
Volume
39
Issue
6
Pages
788–799
Identifiers
PMID: 17116507
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Common sense and psychological research tell us that connections to adults--parents and others--are integral to the process of normal human development. A substantial research literature exists on the role of the parent-child relationship in development, and there is a smaller, but growing body of research that explores the effects of nonparental relationships. Adolescents, in particular, are open to nonparental adults as they strive to create for themselves lives more independent from their parents while still valuing advice from those more experienced than they. The most commonly examined nonparental relationship is that of a teacher and a student. One of the less explored areas of investigation is the importance of relationships youth have with adults they find in their weekend and after-school activities. This article examines field research that has been conducted over the past 15 years on youth programs, to address what has been learned about "connectedness" as it manifests itself in the field. By connectedness, we mean primarily the attachment youth have to the adults in the programs.

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