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Reversible lesions of the corpus callosum with initially restricted diffusion in a series of Caucasian children

Authors
  • Le Bras, Anthony1
  • Proisy, Maia1
  • Kuchenbuch, Mathieu2
  • Gomes, Constantin2
  • Tréguier, Catherine1
  • Napuri, Sylvia2
  • Quehen, Emmanuel3
  • Bruneau, Bertrand1
  • 1 Hôpital Sud, CHU de Rennes, Department of Medical Imaging, Rennes, France , Rennes (France)
  • 2 Hôpital sud, CHU Rennes, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Rennes, France , Rennes (France)
  • 3 CHU Pontchaillou, Department of Medical Imaging, Rennes, France , Rennes (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pediatric Radiology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 17, 2018
Volume
48
Issue
7
Pages
999–1007
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00247-018-4124-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

BackgroundReversible lesions of the corpus callosum with initial restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are rare and mainly described in the south Asiatic population.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentation, imaging findings, prognosis and etiology of transient restricted diffusion lesions of the corpus callosum in a series of Caucasian children.Materials and methodsSeven children presenting with a transient restricted DWI lesion of the corpus callosum were included. Their clinical presentations and paraclinical examinations were investigated in addition to their MRI findings during the acute phase and at follow-up.ResultsFive patients initially presenting with prodromal flu-like symptoms were diagnosed with mild encephalopathy with reversible corpus callosum lesions, three of which were due to the influenza virus. For two patients (twins) with a stroke-like presentation and without febrile illness, a central nervous system manifestation of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with connexin 32 mutation was diagnosed. All patients had a good clinical prognosis without clinical sequelae or residual MRI lesion for all patients at follow-up.ConclusionA transient lesion of the corpus callosum with restricted diffusion should prompt the radiologist to suggest an infectious trigger in children. The prognosis of these patients was good with normalization of clinical symptoms and MRI without any specific treatment.

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