Reversible atrial fibrillation secondary to a mega-oesophagus

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Reversible atrial fibrillation secondary to a mega-oesophagus

Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Dec 13, 2006
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Medicine
License
Unknown

Abstract

1472-6815-6-15.fm ral BMC Ear, Nose and Throat ss BioMed CentDisorders Open AcceCase report Reversible atrial fibrillation secondary to a mega-oesophagus Tahwinder Upile*1, Waseem Jerjes1, Mohammed El Maaytah1, Sandeep Singh1, Colin Hopper1 and Jaspal Mahil2 Address: 1Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery/Head & Neck Unit, University College London Hospitals, London, UK and 2General Practice, University College London Hospital, London, UK Email: Tahwinder Upile* - [email protected]; Waseem Jerjes - [email protected]; Mohammed El Maaytah - [email protected]; Sandeep Singh - [email protected]; Colin Hopper - [email protected]; Jaspal Mahil - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and it increases in prevalence with advancing age to about 5% in people older than 65 years. Case presentation: We present a rare case of atrial fibrillation secondary to a mega-oesophagus occurring in an 84-years-old Caucasian woman. The patient had a history of progressive dysphagia and the accumulation of food debris lead to mega-oesophagus. Conclusion: The diagnosis was made by barium swallow and electrocardiogram; evacuations of 300 ml of the food debris lead to complete resolution of the arrhythmia. The possible aetiology leading to this AF is discussed. Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and it increases in prevalence with advancing age to about 5% in people older than 65 years (Table 1). The chance of developing atrial fibrillation at age 40 years or older is about 25% in men and women. This arrhyth- mia accounts for about one-third of all strokes, and 30% of all patients with atrial fibrillation have a family history of the disease [1]. When the atria are in fibrillation, contraction occurs at rates of 350–900 per minute. The AV node may conduct these impulses to the ventricles at 90–170 beats per minute, and often higher. There are several complem

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