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A Retrospective Review of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence: Comparing Absorbable and Nonabsorbable Sutures.

Authors
  • MacKoul, Paul1
  • Danilyants, Natalya1
  • Sarfoh, Vanessa1
  • van der Does, Louise2
  • Kazi, Nilofar1
  • 1 Tower Surgical Partners, Rockville, Maryland.
  • 2 Tower Surgical Partners, Rockville, Maryland. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
27
Issue
1
Pages
122–128
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmig.2019.03.002
PMID: 30853572
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To compare the rate of spontaneous and complete vaginal cuff dehiscence (VCD) using absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures for vaginal cuff closure. Retrospective comparative cohort design. Freestanding ambulatory surgery center in suburban Maryland. Women age >18 years old who underwent hysterectomy for benign conditions between October 2013 and April 2018. Laparoscopic retroperitoneal hysterectomy was performed by 2 gynecologic surgical specialists. Transvaginal cuff closure was performed using either absorbable Vicryl (polyglactin 910) sutures (n = 881) or nonabsorbable Ethibond (polyester) sutures (n = 574). The nonabsorbable sutures were surgically removed after 90 days. No statistically significant differences in age, race, weight, body mass index, parity, uterine weight, or number of comorbidities were noted between the nonabsorbable and absorbable suture groups. Spontaneous vaginal cuff dehiscence (VCD) occurred in 3 patients (0.52%) in the nonabsorbable group and in 12 patients (1.4%) in the absorbable group (p = .183). Eleven of the 12 cases of VCD in the absorbable group were precipitated by intercourse and occurred within 90 days of surgery. Our data suggest that use of a nonabsorbable suture may be an effective approach to prevent spontaneous VCD, but the benefits should be weighed against the inherent risk associated with a second procedure to remove sutures. Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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