Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Retrograde Parotidectomy and facial nerve outcomes: A case series of 44 patients.

Authors
  • Kligerman, Maxwell P1
  • Song, Yohan2
  • Schoppy, David2
  • Divi, Vasu2
  • Megwalu, Uchechukwu C2
  • Haughey, Bruce H3
  • Sirjani, Davud2
  • 1 Stanford University School of Medicine, 291 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, 801 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94305.
  • 3 Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, 2 Park Road, Grafton 1023, Auckland, New Zealand; Florida Hospital Celebration Health, 400 Celebration Pl, Kissimmee, FL 34747. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of otolaryngology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
38
Issue
5
Pages
533–536
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2017.05.003
PMID: 28647300
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The most common surgical method to remove benign parotid tumors remains the prograde approach. We examined if a retrograde surgical technique offers better outcomes than historical prograde controls. A retrospective chart review at Stanford Hospital was conducted to identify retrograde parotidectomies between February 2012 and October 2014 that were staffed by the senior author (DS) with resident involvement. Facial nerve (FN) outcomes and other post-surgical parameters were recorded. We identified 44 consecutive cases and found that 18.2% (n=8) of patients experienced temporary paresis and 2.3% (n=1) experienced minor (HB 2) permanent paresis limited to one branch. The average hospital length of stay was 0.64 days and complication rate was 6.8%. The retrograde technique has complication rates comparable to historical rates for the prograde technique and is amenable to minimally invasive outpatient superficial parotidectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times