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A retest of two HIV disclosure theories: the women's story.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Health & social work
Publication Date
Volume
33
Issue
1
Pages
23–31
Identifiers
PMID: 18326447
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of two theories of HIV disclosure previously tested with men. Participants included 125 HIV-positive women enrolled in a larger, longitudinal study of HIV disclosure and mental health. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the proposed theoretical models. The disease progression model contained two single-indicator exogenous variables (disease progression) and one endogenous latent variable (disclosure). The original consequences model contained two single-indicator exogenous variables (disease progression), two single-indicator endogenous variables (consequences), and one endogenous latent variable (disclosure). The revised consequences model contained two single-indicator exogenous variables (consequences) and one endogenous latent variable (disclosure). The results of this study support the revised consequences theory and an earlier claim that disease progression may not be a direct predictor of HIV disclosure. This suggests that women may evaluate the consequences of disclosure to family and friends, particularly the reward, before the disclosure occurs.

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