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Results of the first bortezomib-based induction therapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Julius Maximilians University of Würzburg Medizinische Klinik II, Oberdürrbacher Str.6, Würzburg 97080, Germany. [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
1744-7666
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Volume
12
Issue
10
Pages
1661–1663
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1517/14656566.2011.575780
PMID: 21554151
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This is a comment on the IFM 2005-01 Phase III trial that compared, for the first time, the efficacy and the safety of a bortezomib-containing induction regimen with conventional chemotherapy before autologous stem-cell transplantation in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Between 2005 and 2008, 482 patients were randomized to vincristin/doxorubicin/dexamethasone (VAD), VAD + dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, etoposide and cisplatin (DCEP) consolidation, bortezomib + dexamethasone and bortezomib + dexamethasone + DCEP consolidation followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation. The trial was conducted in 89 sites in France, Belgium and Switzerland. The novel agent-based induction therapy (bortezomib/dexamethasone) achieved higher complete remission (CR)/nearCR rates, as well as less treatment-related mortality, but higher rates of polyneuropathy than the conventional chemotherapy-based induction therapy (VAD/VAD + DCEP). The difference in progression-free survival (PFS) difference was not statistically significant but a trend to longer PFS was seen to favor to the bortezomib-containing regimen; bortezomib and dexamethason (BD) was, therefore, proposed to be a standard of care by the authors of the study.

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