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Resting-state functional connectivity of anterior and posterior cerebellar lobes is altered in multiple sclerosis.

Authors
  • Pasqua, Gabriele1
  • Tommasin, Silvia2
  • Bharti, Komal2
  • Ruggieri, Serena2
  • Petsas, Nikolaos3
  • Piervincenzi, Claudia2
  • Pozzilli, Carlo4
  • Pantano, Patrizia5
  • 1 Medicine and Health Science Department, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy/Human Neuroscience Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Human Neuroscience Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 3 IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 Human Neuroscience Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy/Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant'Andrea, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 5 Department of Human Neuroscience, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy/IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Multiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
27
Issue
4
Pages
539–548
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1352458520922770
PMID: 32463319
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Damage to the cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive domains may underlie physical and cognitive disability. To investigate resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of sensorimotor and cognitive cerebellum, and clinical correlates in multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 119 patients with MS and 42 healthy subjects underwent multimodal 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients were evaluated using the Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite Scale. After parcellation of sensorimotor (lobules I-V + VIII) and cognitive cerebellum (lobules VI, VII, IX, X), we calculated cerebellar resting-state FC using a seed-based approach. In patients with MS, the sensorimotor cerebellum showed increased FC mainly with cerebellar, thalamic, and cortical (frontal, parietal, temporal) areas and decreased FC with insular areas; the cognitive cerebellum showed increased FC mainly with thalamic and cortical (temporal-occipital) areas, and decreased FC with frontal-insular areas. Both sensorimotor and cognitive cerebellar FC negatively correlated with disability, and positively with cognitive scores. Cerebellar structural damage only partially influenced results. The two neocerebellar circuits showed altered FC with subcortical and cortical areas. The association between increased sensorimotor and cognitive cerebellar FC and low levels of physical and cognitive disability suggests that altered FC might modulate the effects of cerebellar structural damage on clinical condition.

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