Affordable Access

Responses to an in-basket activity: The role of work stress, behavioral control, and informational control

Authors
  • Jimmieson, Nerina L.
  • Terry, Deborah J.
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1997
Source
Queensland University of Technology ePrints Archive
Keywords
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

This study was undertaken to examine the main and interactive effects of work stress and work control on levels of adjustment. Work stress, behavioral control, and informational control were manipulated in an experimental setting in which participants (N = 192) completed an in-basket activity. Although minimal support was found for the main and interactive effects of objective work stress, behavioral control, and informational control on adjustment, analyses involving the subjective measures of these variables revealed strong support for the proposal that work stress, behavioral control, and informational control would exert main effects on adjustment. There was also evidence that subjective levels of behavioral control buffered the negative effects of subjective work stress on positive mood, subjective task performance, and task satisfaction.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times