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Response of immunosympathectomized rats to training.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of applied physiology: respiratory, environmental and exercise physiology
Publication Date
Volume
42
Issue
6
Pages
935–940
Identifiers
PMID: 881393
Source
Medline

Abstract

The influence of chronic exercise was investigated with male rats assigned to normal (N) and sympathectomized (IS) groups. Animals in the latter group were injected daily for 5 days with the antiserum to the nerve growth factor beginning 24 h after birth. Training was introduced when the animals were 35--45 days old and lasted for 12 wk. The exercise program used by both groups was progressive in nature and modified in accordance with the performance capability of the IS animals. When IS and N rats performed a standardized treadmill test, the IS rats had significantly higher rectal temperatures than normal animals. Significant training differences were observed in resting heart rate and in mean blood pressures, but only in the N animals. However, both trained groups exhibited significantly less vasoconstricting ability to conditions of lower body negative pressure than their nontrained controls. Varied doses of epinephrine and norepinephrine were injected into both groups and training per se had no significant influence on the responses recorded. However, both IS group had changes which indicated that a supersensitivity to catecholamines had occurred. Although selective training adaptations can occur without sympathetic nerves, it was concluded that an intact nervous system was essential for maximal training effects to occur.

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